National employers must navigate a maze of state and local paid sick leave laws with different requirements. That maze is especially burdensome for employers in Minnesota, where employers have dealt with local sick leave ordinances in Minneapolis, Saint Paul, Bloomington, and Duluth. Last year, Minnesota passed a statewide paid sick leave law that went into effect on January 1, 2024. In cities with a local sick leave ordinance, employers must comply with the requirements of both the state and local laws. That means employers must compare each provision of the state law to all of the local ordinances and follow the provision that is more friendly to employees.

Fortunately, the differences between the state law and the ordinances in Minneapolis, Saint Paul, and Bloomington are minor. For example, the laws all allow employees to accrue one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours of work, up to a maximum of 48 hours per year. 

Duluth’s paid sick leave ordinance, however, has terms that differ more radically. In Duluth, employees earn one hour of paid sick leave for every 50 hours of work, up to a maximum of 64 hours per year.

Yesterday, Duluth made sick leave compliance easier for Minnesota employers by repealing its sick leave ordinance. Now employers can focus on compliance with the new state law and the similar local ordinances in Minneapolis, Saint Paul, and Bloomington.

We will continue to monitor sick leave developments in Minnesota and across the country.

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Photo of W. Brian Holladay W. Brian Holladay

Brian represents employers in all areas of labor and employment law. As co-chair of the Firm’s National Compliance team, he frequently advises employers on compliance with national, state, and local legal requirements. Brian’s areas of expertise include guiding employers through the disciplinary and…

Brian represents employers in all areas of labor and employment law. As co-chair of the Firm’s National Compliance team, he frequently advises employers on compliance with national, state, and local legal requirements. Brian’s areas of expertise include guiding employers through the disciplinary and termination process, leave and other accommodation requests, pay equity and transparency laws, and fair workweek legislation. Brian drafts employee handbooks and other policies, employment agreements, and restrictive covenants (such as non-compete, non-solicit, and confidentiality agreements).

Brian also defends employers in courts and administrative agencies across the country. Clients rely on Brian for the defense of employment-related claims such as Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, and the National Labor Relations Act. Likewise, Brian assists with high-stakes government audits and investigations, including matters before the EEOC, DOL Wage and Hour Division, OFCCP, and OSHA.

Brian has earned a reputation for his expertise in issues related to the use of staffing agencies, including contracting issues, managing co-employment risk, and defending claims filed by staffing agency employees. He also litigates business torts and contract disputes.

Brian grew up in Knoxville, Tennessee. He received his bachelor’s degree, magna cum laude, from Furman University, where he was captain of the Track and Field team.  Prior to joining the firm, Brian served as a law clerk to the Honorable Gerrilyn G. Brill of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia.

Brian earned his J.D., magna cum laude, from Duke University School of Law. He is now a Senior Lecturing Fellow at Duke University School of Law. He teaches a course called A Practitioner’s Guide to Employment Law.

In his free time, Brian enjoys coaching his children’s youth sports teams.